The Star Festival

This is a 1927 painting by Edwin Blashfield. It is an allegory of spring in which a female nude representing spring stands on a crescent moon, with an angel watching behind her. She is scattering stars throughout the cloudy sky.
Spring Scattering Stars by Edwin Blashfield
This painting depicts a group of fairies from a Shakespearean tale dancing in the forest at night.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream by Gustave Doré
This artwork is an allegory of winter. It portrays two women in light semi-transparent garments. The younger woman seems to have fallen asleep on her friend's shoulder.
Winter by Wilhelm Kray
This painting depicts a nude woman falling through space, like a shooting star.Her body radiates light, and there is a string of pearls around her wrist.
Falling Star by Witold Pruszkowski
My distant angel,
Only you can decipher
This secret message.

Deep in the shadows
Where summer turns to autumn
Once a year, we meet.

Two star-crossed lovers
Separated by darkness,
United by light.

The sky will show you
Our celestial counterparts:
Vega and Altair.

Ceci n’est pas une Rose

This painting features a rose blooming alone on the edge of a cliff surrounded by the sea; it is dawn, and there are beautiful clouds in the sky blending with the horizon.
L’utopie (Utopia) by René Magritte
This surrealistic painting captures a gigantic red rose, occupying an entire room.
Le tombeau des lutteurs (The tomb of the wrestlers) by René Magritte
This surreal image portrays the ocean ic beach at sunset. Instead of the sun, there is a large rose, which seems to float on the waves.
L’invitation au voyage (The Invitation to Travel) by René Magritte
A portrait of a woman gazing longingly at a rose in her long golden hair. There are impressionistic visions of the sea and the mountains in the background.
Le Roman Populaire (The Popular Novel) by René Magritte
If you were a rose,
You would hide in the dark
Until I discovered your delicate spark.

If you were a rose,
Every flower would fade,
Entranced by the perfume which you radiate.

If you were a rose,
Your soft, velvety skin
Would cover my eyes with the raptures unseen.

If you were a rose,
I would kiss your wild thorns,
Crimson with blood, as it lingers and burns.

If you were a rose,
You would bloom all year long,
Drinking my tears when I cry, all alone.

If you were a rose,
You would grow in my heart,
Entwining it gently, as you tear me apart.

My garden has blossomed 
With sorrow and loss.
Why didn't you tell me that you were a rose?

Бесконечность Судеб

This painting depicts the Ancient Greek poetess, Sappho, as she faces the stormy ocean, standing on the cliff's edge in flowing white clothing. According to the legend, Sappho threw herself off the cliffs of the Greek island Leucadia, due to losing her lover.
Sappho by Miguel Carbonell Selva (1881)

“Шторм надвигается!” – глухо шипят волны прилива, разбиваясь о скалы и разбрызгивая свои яростные объятия по стонущему берегу. Среди подступающей воды в неподвижном ожидании замер мрачный силуэт. Юная девушка с тёмными глазами, устремлёнными на край Земли, поёт, а её волосы цвета воронова крыла развеваются в мощных порывах ледяного океанического воздуха…

Continue reading “Бесконечность Судеб”

“Light and Shade: Serious (and Not so Serious) Poems” – a Guest Post by Kevin Morris

I am profoundly delighted that my kind friend, Kevin Morris, whose imaginative poetry inspires me with its wittiness and creativity, has composed a guest post for my site. Please, do not hesitate to follow his excellent blog: K Morris – Poet

My sincere thanks to Veronica for her kindness in allowing me to write a guest post for The Waves of Poetry. I am an admirer of Veronica’s work, and I’m delighted to be hosted on her excellent blog.  

In August 2019, I published my “Selected Poems,” https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07WW8WXPP/

“The Selected Poems of K Morris” comprises a selection of poems composed by me between 2013-2019, most of which deal with serious matters of life, the passage of time and nature. 

In contrast, my soon to be released collection, “Light and Shade: Serious (and Not so Serious) Poems” does, as the title suggests, contain both serious and humorous verses. 

Continue reading ““Light and Shade: Serious (and Not so Serious) Poems” – a Guest Post by Kevin Morris”

“A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” by James Joyce (1916) ★★★★

Not to Be Reproduced (La Reproduction Interdite). René Magritte, 1937.
Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam

“To arts unknown he bends his wits, and alters nature.”

― Ovid, Metamorphoses.

Myriads of evocative images permeate the debut novel of the most influential Irish modernist, conveying the entire spectrum of feelings ranging from religious fervour to the ardour of lust. A master of intertextuality, Joyce intermingles philosophical discussions (unfortunately, often one-sided, despite their doubtless intellectual splendour) with “scraps of poetry and madness” – playful allusions to ancient myths and historical events. Nevertheless, a vivid combination of excessive naturalism and vague surrealism may be exhausting for the reader, as the rigorous author does not attempt to ease the acute transitions from one state of consciousness into another. It is only for the literary adventurers themselves to decide whether this egocentric coming-of-age journey is worth the effervescent, yet turbulent ride.

Continue reading ““A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” by James Joyce (1916) ★★★★”

My Translation of Marina Tsvetaeva’s Cycle “Girlfriend” – Part 4

Illustration: Devotion: the Two Girlfriends, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1895
***
You were too lazy to get dressed,
Too lazy to rise from the armchair.
- Although Your next day could be blessed
With my pure gaiety and laughter.

You were embarrassed most of all
To walk at night amid the snowfall.
- Although Your hours could be bold
With my excitement - jolly, youthful.

My darling, You have meant no harm,
So irreversibly benign.
- You were all innocence and charm,
I was the youth that passed You by.

October 25, 1914

Click to see the original poem

My Translation of Marina Tsvetaeva’s Cycle “Girlfriend” – Part 3

Illustration: “The Window Seat” by Robert Burns, 1905-1906.
Picture Editing: Pascale Clerie
***
I’ve spent all day beside the window,
The snow was melting everywhere.
My mind was sober, bosom - tender,
Again I live without care.

I don’t know why. It must be languor,
The mere exhaustion of the soul,
I simply couldn’t bear to handle
My pencil - riotous and bold.

And so I stood - the foggy valance -
Concealed both evil and caress,
My finger gently broke the silence
By tapping on the fragile glass.

My spirit’s neither worse, nor better
Than any stranger - whom I’ve met, -
Than puddles of pearlescent glitter,
The mirrored sky above my head,

Than bird in flight, so free and dauntless,
Than racing dog with fluffy ears,
And even the impoverished songstress
No longer can bring me to tears.

The charming art of sweet oblivion
I’ve memorized from the start.
Today a feeling worth a million
Was slowly melting in my heart.


October 24, 1914

Click to see the original poem

My Translation of Marina Tsvetaeva’s Cycle “Girlfriend” – Part 2

Illustration: Ladies and a Cat, Louis Icart, 1923
***
Under the plush plaid's tender softness
I lie, remembering last night.
Was it a dream? - Who broke the fortress? -
Who lost the fight?

Again comes bitter rumination,
And suffering hits me anew.
Words can't define this revelation -
Do I love you?

Who was the hunter? - Who - the victim? 
The devil has reversed it all!
What purring, wise Siberian kitten
May now recall?

In that self-willed and fervent duel,
Who held the shield, and who - the sword?
Whose heartbeat - Yours or mine - was cruel,
And raced, and soared?

What - after all - was our story?
What do I long for and regret?
Still wondering: was this my glory?
Or my death-bed?


October 23, 1914

Click to see the original poem