The Star Festival

This is a 1927 painting by Edwin Blashfield. It is an allegory of spring in which a female nude representing spring stands on a crescent moon, with an angel watching behind her. She is scattering stars throughout the cloudy sky.
Spring Scattering Stars by Edwin Blashfield
This painting depicts a group of fairies from a Shakespearean tale dancing in the forest at night.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream by Gustave Doré
This artwork is an allegory of winter. It portrays two women in light semi-transparent garments. The younger woman seems to have fallen asleep on her friend's shoulder.
Winter by Wilhelm Kray
This painting depicts a nude woman falling through space, like a shooting star.Her body radiates light, and there is a string of pearls around her wrist.
Falling Star by Witold Pruszkowski
My distant angel,
Only you can decipher
This secret message.

Deep in the shadows
Where summer turns to autumn
Once a year, we meet.

Two star-crossed lovers
Separated by darkness,
United by light.

The sky will show you
Our celestial counterparts:
Vega and Altair.

12 thoughts on “The Star Festival

  1. Ohhhhh Veronica this is very enchanting. The images as well. And you’ve given me another lesson. The story of Vega and Altair, I looked it up thanks to your poem: star-crossed lovers, yes, the goddess woman and the human man, both made into heavenly bodies by the outraged father of the goddess, but the two made to stay forever apart in the sky, separated by the path of the Milky Way galaxy. Only together for one night of the year. But what a night it might be. Sigh. 💖

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ah, dearest Lia! ♥️
      I am astounded by the poetic discernment and depth of your perception! Not many would take time to read this legend, let alone write such a heartfelt comment, connecting the dots between my poem and the story which inspired it. I am immensely grateful to have such attentive readers!✨ And yes, what a night! I bet all the wait is worth it in the end. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you so much for the smile-inducing reply Veronica! Yes, worth the wait in the end… inspiring thought. 😏💕✍️ Write on 🤟🙌👯‍♂️

        Liked by 1 person

  2. A wholly lovely poem with the most beautiful illustrations.
    It’s such a pleasure to read and to look at, Veronica.
    Thank you.
    Gwen.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. You translate the legend of two star-crossed celestial lovers so movingly in poetry, Veronica! The Koreans traditionally celebrate the long-waited yearly rendezvous of the princess and her mortal lover on the seventh day of July when a bridge of magpies is formed across the celestial river that cruelly separates the lovers. It’s a plaintive yet beautiful love story.

    “Two star-crossed lovers
    Separated by darkness,
    United by light.” is the most captivating allusion to the bridge of heavenly magpies lit with a ray of hope that the lovers are to be together. While reading the poem, the scenes are screened in my mental theater in a phantasmagorial display of the legend. Your poem conveys both sadness and happiness, despair, and hope, which I find essential characteristics of your fanciful poetry 🙂 Beautiful! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dear Stephanie, your exquisite comment is even more poetic than my haiku! ♡ I knew you would recognize the myth immediately – this is why I was so anxious about your reaction to my poem. Words can’t describe how happy I am that you enjoyed it! As you rightfully said, I love the poignant antithesis of “sadness and happiness, despair, and hope.” Your poetry also possesses these remarkable contrasts – hence our mutual appreciation. 🌸

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Your haiku is very riveting as with all your poetry, Veronica. 🌺I thank you for your compliment on my opinions, which come from the truth of beauty. Yes, we are the cult of beauty that is rare and precious. We have a third eye: our native languages, the English, and the arts, especially literature. ⭐️

        Liked by 1 person

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